Tyneside Floddies all mine, all mine…

Bacon Floddies, a sort of potato cake, are a tradition part of a Tyneside breakfast and would be served with eggs and sausages.  Apparently they originated on the canals where the navvies would cook them on their shovels over the fire.

TYNESIDE FLODDIES

Utensils:
1 x potato peeler
1 x grater
1 x tea towel – clean!
1 x mixing bowl
1 x large frying pan
Kitchen roll (paper towel) to drain

Ingredients:
10oz / 300g potatoes – peeled
1 large onion – finely chopped
6oz / 180g bacon – rinds off and finely chopped
2oz / 60g self raising flour
2 eggs
oil for frying

Method:
Grate the potatoes onto the tea towel
Gather it up and squeeze the liquid out of the potatoes
Put the chopped onion into a bowl and add the potatoes, bacon and flour
Season to taste
Beat the eggs into the potato mixture
Heat the oil in the frying pan to a medium heat
Put ample tablespoonfuls of the potato mixture into the frying pan and flatten them out to form round cakes
Cook on each side until golden brown and cooked all the way through – about 4 minutes each side
Lift out of the pan and drain the oil off on the kitchen paper
Serve immediately with fried eggs and good sausages and shovel it down!

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7 Comments

Filed under Food, Recipes, Regional, Slider

7 responses to “Tyneside Floddies all mine, all mine…

  1. There is no version of hash browns that I don’t like. I have had them everyday for breakfast for the last week and I’ll have them tomorrow.

  2. Morag

    I should not read blog posts like this at 1am! It makes even me want to cook.

  3. Toffeeapple

    I’m very pleased that I had eaten before I read this post.

  4. I have never heard of them, but they sound delicious!

  5. Joy

    They sound delicious. My boys would like them.

  6. This is extraordinary – I grew up on Tyneside and have never ever seen these before…is it an old recipe or a new one (I left 20 years ago)?

    • wartimehousewife

      Hi Helen. This is a very old recipe that came from the navvies working on the canals in the 1800s. They are also sometimes called ‘Gateshead or Durham Floddies’.

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