Tag Archives: freezer

Orange Ice Cream

I seem to have ended up with a glut of oranges, I can’t quite remember why, and I needed something to do with them.  Now, this is going to sound a bit crap but, despite being very fond of oranges and their products, I absolutely hate peeling them.  I hate the bits of pith up my nails and the fact that they make my fingers sore and I don’t like the sticky, sickly smell that only occurs when someone else is peeling them.  What makes a human being think it’s ok to eat an orange on the London Underground for example?

There was a 30-second flash of sunshine yesterday, so I decided to make ice-cream.  The recipe I use calls for four egg yolks, which leaves four egg whites with which to make meringues.  Hurrah!  I have an ice cream maker which does all the churning for me.  If you don’t have one, you need to semi-freeze the ice cream, take it out, whip it again, then return it to the freezer.

Also remember, you could use lemons for a lovely tangy alternative.  Or indeed mangoes.

ORANGE ICE CREAM

Utensils:
1 x lemon squeezer or juice extractor
1 x medium bowl
1 x grater with a fine-grating side
1 x electric mixer or a wooden spoon and a firm hand
1 x small saucepan
1 x medium saucepan
1 x heatproof bowl to go on the top of it
1 x freezerproof container with a lid

Ingredients:
4 large oranges
4 egg yolks
4oz / 120g castor sugar
½ pint / 10floz / 300ml single cream
¼ pint /  5floz / 150ml double cream – lightly whipped
2oz dark chocolate drops or grated chocolate (optional)

Method:
Squeeze every drop of juice out of the oranges and put to one side
Finely grate the zest of the oranges
Put the grated zest into a heat proof bowl with the egg yolks and sugar
Beat thoroughly until slightly lighter in colour
Heat the single cream in the small saucepan until almost boiling
Stir the single cream into the egg yolk and orange zest
Place this bowl of a medium pan of simmering water
Stir until thickened, then remove from the heat
Add the orange juice, stir well, then set aside in the fridge to cool
When cold, fold the whipped double cream into the mixture
If you have an ice cream maker, put the mixture in it with the chocolate drops and let it do its work
If you don’t, pour the mixture into the freezer-proof container & put the lid on
Place in the freezer until it resembles slush
Take it out and beat it again – add the chocolate if you’re using it
Return it to the freezer with the lid on again and leave until frozen.

Remember that with home-made ice cream, you need to take it out of the freezer at least 20 minutes before you intend to use it or you will need a pneumatic drill to get it out of the tub.
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Filed under Food, Leftovers, Recipes

The Basic Storecupboard

Storecupboard 17.08.09I have referred in several previous articles to the importance of storecupboard ingredients.  We are fortunate that nowadays we all have a fridge and most of us have a freezer of some description, whereas our parents probably didn’t have either when they were young.  These appliances give us much more scope for planning ahead and for always having something in if we haven’t had time to shop. In an ideal world, we would plan meals days in advance and shop appropriately for the week ahead, but this is not always possible when one is trying to keep track of several people and arrangements seem to change at the drop of a hat.  It is also vitally important not to over shop and end up throwing food away.  Wasting food is wicked, be under no illusion, and it serves only to increase the profits of those who already have too much of the nation’s wealth.  I read in the newspaper recently that the average family throws away nearly £400 worth of food a year.  Four hundred pounds.  That is what I spend on food shopping in ten weeks.  That would pay for the food, clothing, housing and education of a child in a Third World country for over a year.  Don’t waste food.  By the same token, there is no point in leaving 2 teaspoons of gravy in a cup at the back of the fridge unless you have a definite plan for it, as this simply arouses the ridicule and loathing of your peers.

A word about microwaves.  I know that many of you nuke everything that casts a shadow and an equal number believe it to be the Baby Belling of Beelzebub.  The Wartime Housewife uses a microwave for several limited tasks.  Defrosting.  Ovaltine.  Porridge.  Custard. Scrambled egg.  My reason is this: bowls in which the above have been microwaved are far less onorous to clean than a saucepan which will have to be left to soak in the sink for a year and a half and then scrubbed with the domestic equivalent of a sandblaster.  Controversial I know, but I am a modern woman and until I have staff, the microwave stays.

 So what do we need to have in the storecupboard that will reliably prevent you rushing to Macky D’s in an emergency.  Over time I will provide many recipes that rely on storecupboard ingredients, but for the time being just make sure you have these in, adjusting the quantities for the size of your family and always buy the best that you can afford, remembering that best doesn’t always mean the most expensive.  Also, things like herbs gradually accumulate, so don’t feel the need to run to the shops and buy the lot at once.

LARDER 
Tinned chopped tomatoes
Tinned kidney beans
Tinned sweetcorn
Tinned tuna
Tinned mackerel
Baked beans
Custard powder
Cocoa
Raspberry Jam
Worcestershire Sauce
Soy sauce
Porridge oats
Stock cubes – chicken, beef & veg
Tinned whole peaches
Tea and coffee
Red lentils
Green lentils
Rice – easy cook
Tomato puree
Sugar – white and dark brown
Flour – plain white, self raising white, plain wholemeal
Pasta – spaghetti and something else
Cooking oil – pref olive but sunflower is perfectly good
Lemon juice
Honey
Golden Syrup
Raisins
Condensed milk
Mustard powder
Assorted dried herbs esp. parsley, mixed herbs, sage, thyme, oregano, bay leaves  Spices: cumin, coriander, turmeric, paprika, ginger 
FREEZER  FRIDGE
Whole chicken
Fish fillets – coley or basa are cheap and as tasty as anything else
Fish fingers
Mince
Lamb’s Liver – very cheap, versatile and incredibly tasty
Vegetables – peas, whole green beans, spinach, corn on the cob
Bread (a few slices can be kept in the smallest freezer)
Sausages
Milk
Eggs
Butter
Bread
Onions
Garlic
Carrots
Cheddar – nice strong stuff
Long life double cream (fresh is always better but we’re talking emergency backup here)
Bananas
Apples
Potatoes
Leftover white wine – put it in a jam jar with a screw lid to save space

This may seem like a lot, but I bet if you were to rummage through your cupboards, freezer and fridge right now, you would find a lot more, of a lot less use, and several things that would arouse the ridicule of your peers. From this basic list, you can feed a family for a week, including cake, biscuits and ice cream lollies, perhaps only needing to top up with milk and bread. Remember also that you can buy fresh items such as onions, peppers and leeks when they’re cheap, chop them up and put them in bags in the freezer for use when you haven’t got or can’t get fresh.

Please let me know if there’s anything I’ve forgotten or anything you think is essential to your storecupboard.

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Filed under Ethics, Food, Storecupboard